Weed profile: Bridal Creeper

by admin on July 24, 2007

Bridal Creeper

Bridal Creeper (Asparagus asparagoides) and Asparagus Fern (Asparagus scandens) are considered to be the top weed priorities for the southern region.

Bridal Creeper forms dense infestations which completely smother native vegetation. It has had a major impact on bushland and on horticulture on mainland Australia.

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Weed profile: Boneseed

by admin on June 24, 2007

Boneseed close up

Boneseed (Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera.) is identified as a high priority weed in the southern region.

Boneseed is identified as one of the top environmental weed threats in the region. It has a major impact on the Tasmanian coastal zone, out-competing and displacing native plants.

Because of Boneseed’s impact on environmental and social values, it has been identified across Australia as a Weed of National Significance.

At the state level, Boneseed is a declared weed, which means that land managers are required to control it on all land tenures.

The Department of Primary Industries and Water has detailed information on Boneseed control.

Weeds Australia has information on Boneseed’s status as a Weed of National Significance,

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Weed profile: Blackberry

by admin on May 24, 2007

blackberry fruit and leaves

Blackberries (Rubus fruticosus agg.) are identified as a high priority weed in the southern region. What we know as “Blackberry” comprises of at least nine different species, all similar in appearance.

Blackberries are identified by farmers and graziers as one of the top weed threats in the region. They also have a major impacts on the environment and people’s ability to access natural areas for recreation.

Because of Blackberries’ impact on economic, environmental and social values, they have been identified across Australia as Weeds of National Significance.

At the state level, blackberries are a declared weed, which means than land managers are required to control them on all land tenures.

Detailed information on blackberry control is available from the Department of Primary Industries and Water.

Information on Blackberries’ status as Weeds of National Significance is available from Weeds Australia.

Blackberry leaves and spines

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